The Mind of the Messiah

How is your thinking? What kind of mindset or attitude do you possess? Where is the source of your philosophy of life and for life? Do you need to refocus or even completely reorient your thinking pattern in this life? Let us consider together...

As we approach the heart of Paul's letter to the Philippians, we notice the following about developing and maintaining unity as Christians:

“So if our shared life in the Messiah brings you any comfort; if love still has the power to make you cheerful; if we really do have a partnership in the Spirit; if your hearts are at all moved with affection and sympathy— then make my joy complete! Bring your thinking into line with one another. Here’s how to do it. Hold on to the same love; bring your innermost lives into harmony; fix your minds on the same object. Never act out of selfish ambition or vanity; instead, regard everybody else as your superior. Look after each other’s best interests, not just your own” (Philippians 2:1-4).

After this strong exhortation to unity in King Jesus on the basis of the blessings that are possible in Him, Paul then reminds them to possess the mind or attitude of the Messiah Himself. He provides them the perfect pattern for an attitude toward God and humanity that will lead to holiness before God and unity with one another. Both the holiness and the unity of Christianity is found in and focused upon these foundational truths concerning the Messiah and His redemptive work. If we want to be godly, and if we want peace with others, then we had better look at and to Jesus. A proper relationship with Jesus is based upon whether we are willing to walk in His footsteps (see 1 John 2:1-6). Paul writes,

“Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in King Jesus, who, though He was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be exploited, but emptied Himself, by taking the form of a slave, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, He humbled Himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. Therefore God has highly exalted Him and bestowed on Him the name that is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that King Jesus is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Philippians 2:5-11).

The verses above can be viewed as a type of poem, and one can easily pick out three or possibly four stanzas in these short lines from the apostle Paul. I suggest that the Holy Spirit's entire point in this larger section of Holy Writing is centered in this poem or summary of Jesus' work. If we miss this...well, then we really miss everything. Have we missed it? Do we truly see it today?

Philippians 2:5-11 is the story about Jesus, the Servant of Israel as set forth by the prophet Isaiah (read chapters 40-66). He leaves Heaven to come to lowly Earth - He arrives - not sitting on a throne of political power, but as a humble slave. Many men are brought low by others, but this God-Man chooses to humble Himself. This poem is also the story of humanity, for it is about the new Adam who will restore all things(see Psalm 8; Hebrews 2; 1 Corinthians 15; and Romans 5). Ultimately, it is the story of Deity – Jesus revealed the true and living God to us (John 1:14-18).    

 

For His infinite worth,

Gantt